Ogilvies Creek

Josh Hutchence, Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

Josh Hutchins and Piermatteo ‘Chippy’ Nissotti get bent.

 

As meadow streams go, Ogilvies creek, in the Kosciuszko national park between Kancoban and Kiandra is my idea of twig heaven and has few equals. It snakes it’s way wildly across a long, narrow high plain and holds good numbers of small rainbow trout and even the odd brookie. With the exception of a few tight stretches in the trees upstream of the road crossing, it’s generally easily fished and waded, though walking the banks in the uneven and often swampy tussocks can be hard work.   Downstream of the road bridge is several kilometres of open meadow that’s easily accessed by walking down the service road on the eastern side of the valley to an intake weir and fishing up-stream. The easy walk is roughly 3 km’s over a well graded road.

The best fish I’ve caught in Ogilvies over many years have come from the water nearest the intake when the hoppers are out and by late summer it’s where I go first. The intake weir itself is small, but does hold some good fish if you’re patient enough to stalk them.

I’ve found the fishing to be best when the wind is right up and the little alpine hoppers are trying swimming for the first (and possibly last) time. The trout get very aggressive and will chase down virtually anything that hits the water.

I wouldn’t get too fussy with fly selection other than to say, that heavy nymphs are more trouble than they’re worth in the mostly shallow ripples between short pools and unweighted and small ones are easier to fish. Smaller hopper patterns, particularly splashy foam ones, work well from mid-summer on and small hair wings, like a #14 Royal Wulff  work anytime the fish are looking up. Double rigs are effective with small nymphs trailed between one and two feet below the dry.

The perfect rod ? In my opinion a longer two or three weight with enough grunt for the windy days, but enough feel for the few tight spots in the trees.

The brook trout are one of the main attractions of the creek though they can be fickle and hard to find. I don’t do anything specifically different from fishing for rainbows when chasing them as they seem to hit the same flies, in the same water as rainbows when they’re around.  They do occasionally have the habit of swiping at a dry without actually eating it, but if you hold your nerve and don’t strike, they may take it a second or two later. It’s pretty exciting to see and worth the price of admission alone.

Josh Hutchins can be contacted about guiding and epic hosted fishing trips here:  Aussie Fly Fisher

Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

The brookies are not large, but special anyway.

 

Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains,Rainbow trout

A beautiful and chubby little rainbow.

 

Josh Hutchence, Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

Josh Hutchins wrestles a good rainbow in tight quarters.

 

Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

Chippy into another rainbow from the shallow ripples.

 

 

 

Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

Chippy doing a bow & arrow cast in a tight section.

 

Twigwater, brook trout, fly fishing, small stream, trout, Snowy mountains

A jewel like brook trout the reward.

 

 

twigwater fly fishing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

  • David says:

    I’ve loved fishing this stream since stumbling accross it a few years ago. The snow crunched under my feet on that beautiful autumn day and I was rewarded with a couple of wild rainbows from above the road. Haven’t ventured far downstream but will definately seek out the trail and give it a shot next time around. Thanks for the article.

  • Anthony Cole says:

    Although I moved to New Zealand a few years ago solely for the fishing (and I do love my new home!) I do still miss the the small stream fishing this region has to offer.
    Its a magic part of the world. The first time I set eyes on Olgilvies it was love at first sight.

    Armed with my favourite 3 weight ,coinciding with a windless and cloudless day in late November 2004, is etched in my memory forever.
    Although the much desired capture of a Brook trout alluded me (still does) the many Rainbows more than made up for it.
    The bare and seemingly lifeless trees just added to the atmosphere …..and the snakes, coiled up on the clumps of button grass kept me on my toes all day!
    Your excellent photographs do it justice.
    Thanks for sending me down memory lane…..

    Anthony Cole

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